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Tour a Royal Canadian Navy Ship

Tour a Royal Canadian Navy Ship

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The Great Lakes Deployment is the voyage of a Navy frigate and two maritime coastal defence vessels to selected ports along the St. Lawrence Seaway and Lake Ontario.

The 2012 excursion provides an opportunity for Canadians in cities along the way to tour Her Majesty's Canadian ships (HMCS) Ville de Québec, Moncton and Summerside and discover career opportunities available with the Canadian Forces.

Climb aboard one of the Canadian Forces’ ships to speak with sailors, ask questions and hear their heroic, heart-warming and inspiring stories about their deployments around the world.

The three ships are staffed by impressive crews of highly trained personnel. The Canadian Forces have a wide range of careers available for the next generation of military personnel, and offer paid education to help you do the job you’ve always dreamed of.


Canadian Cities

Cornwall, ON


when

Tuesday, September 25, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, September 26, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec

where

Government Jetty accessible corner of Edward Street and Harbour Road

get directions

Hamilton, ON


when

Wednesday, September 19, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. (US ship will be open for visitation until 5 p.m.)
Thursday, September 20, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. (US ship will be open for visitation until 4 p.m.)
Thursday, September 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec, USS Hurricane

where

Pier 8 accessible via Waterfront Trail

get directions

Montreal, QC


when

Tuesday, July 31, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. (US ships will be open for visitation until 5 p.m.)
Wednesday, August 1, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. (US ships will be open for visitation until 4 p.m.)
Thursday, August 2, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec, USS De Wert, USS Hurricane

where

Clock Tower Jetty, Section 19

get directions

Oshawa, ON


when

Saturday, September 22, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday, September 23, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec

where

West Entrance at the foot of Simcoe Street South

get directions

Quebec City, QC


when

Friday, July 27, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. (US ships will be open for visitation until 4 p.m.)
Saturday, July 28, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. (US ships will be open for visitation until 5 p.m.)
Sunday, July 29, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec, USS De Wert, USS Hurricane

where

Pointe-à-Carcy, Quai 22

get directions

Sept-Îles, QC


when

Wednesday, October 3, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Thursday, October 4, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec

where

Cruise Terminal

get directions

Thunder Bay, ON


when

Thursday, August 16, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday, August 17, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, August 18, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, August 19, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec

where

Pier/Pool 6 accessible via Marina Park Drive

get directions

Toronto, ON


when

Thursday, August 30, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday, August 31, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sunday, September 2, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

 

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec, USCGC Biscayne Bay

where

Corus Quay at the foot of Jarvis Street

get directions

Trois-Rivières, QC


when

Saturday, September 29, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday, September 30, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec

where

Jetty #3 – Adjacent to the Trois-Rivières Harbourfront Park

get directions

Windsor, ON


when

Thursday, September 6, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Friday, September 7, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, September 8, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, September 9, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Ships Present

HMCS Ville de Québec

where

Dieppe Gardens

get directions

American Cities

Buffalo, NY


when

September 11 to September 17
Additional details on hours of visitations and events in United States cities can be found at www.ourflagwasstillthere.org

Chicago, IL


when

August 15 to August 20
Additional details on hours of visitations and events in United States cities can be found at www.ourflagwasstillthere.org

Cleveland, OH


when

August 28 to September 2
Additional details on hours of visitations and events in United States cities can be found at www.ourflagwasstillthere.org

Milwaukee, WI


when

August 8 to August 13
Additional details on hours of visitations and events in United States cities can be found at www.ourflagwasstillthere.org

Toledo, OH


when

August 23 to August 27
Additional details on hours of visitations and events in United States cities can be found at www.ourflagwasstillthere.org

HMCS Ville de Québec

Picture of HMCS Quebec on ocean

Welcome aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Ville de Québec. During your visit, you will have a glimpse into what life in the Navy is like aboard one of the Canadian Forces’ most prestigious ships. By touring the ship, handling sophisticated equipment and speaking with the sailors, you will have a first-hand experience of a world-class Navy.

Commissioned in 1994, HMCS Ville de Québec is one of 12 Canadian-built Halifax Class frigates in the Royal Canadian Navy. The ship is one of the seven frigates belonging to Canada’s East Coast Fleet based out of Halifax, Nova Scotia.

The vessel possesses an advanced suite of weapons and sensors capable of detecting, tracking and engaging hostile air, surface and submarine threats.

The ship uses a combined diesel or gas propulsion system. The diesel cruise engine provides excellent fuel economy while the gas turbine engines enable the ship to travel at speeds as high as 30 knots (about 55 km/h).

The ship’s crew is highly trained, professional and committed, ensuring maximum readiness and efficiency. While the crew is comprised of many trades and positions, it operates the ship as a single team.

The Navy is made up of all types of people – women and men like you, who, through training and experience, have learned to accomplish extraordinary things. Navy life is rigorous, but it is also rewarding. Just ask the sailors aboard this ship, whose lives have been changed because of their experiences in Canada and abroad.

The Navy supports the Canadian Forces in fulfilling its three roles:

  • Defending Canada
  • Defending North America
  • Contributing to International Peace and Security

In 2011 HMCS Ville de Québec emerged from a refit in its home port of Halifax, Nova Scotia, well-equipped to play key roles in supporting Canadian interests from counter-terrorism, counter-piracy and humanitarian support operations overseas to fisheries patrols in the North Atlantic.

Most recently, HMCS Ville de Québec conducted fisheries patrols on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, participating in multinational task group exercises, as well as playing a significant role in a major joint exercise off Cape Breton in Nova Scotia.

In 2009, Ville de Québec supported the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. The ship provided maritime surveillance throughout the meeting.

In 2008, Ville de Québec escorted food-carrying cargo vessels between Mombasa, Kenya and Mogadishu, Somalia. The route took the freighters and the Canadian patrol frigate through waters well-known for pirate attacks. By the end of the mission, Ville de Québec and its crew ensured the delivery of 36 million kilograms of food.

HMCS Moncton

Picture of HMCS Moncton on ocean

Welcome aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Moncton. During your visit, you will have a glimpse into what life in the Navy is like aboard one of the Canadian Forces’ Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels. By touring the ship, handling sophisticated equipment and speaking with the sailors, you will have a first-hand experience of a world-class Navy.

HMCS Moncton is the 9th Kingston Class maritime coastal defense vessel, designed for coastal surveillance measures to protect national sovereignty. 

HMCS Moncton’s versatile deck capabilities allow it to adapt to a variety of equipment, enabling it to do naval mine countermeasures, bottom object inspection, sonar scanning of the seabed and remote underwater vehicle operations.

The first ship to bear the name Moncton was a Flower Class corvette that served the Royal Canadian Navy throughout World War II. She escorted 57 convoys across the Atlantic Ocean before being transferred to the Pacific Fleet at the end of the War.

The crew, primarily made up of Naval Reserve personnel, carries out operational tasks such as mine countermeasures, search and rescue and maritime domain awareness. HMCS Moncton’s other functions include anti-smuggling operations, resource protection, fisheries and environmental monitoring, counter-terrorism, disaster relief and scientific research.

The Navy is made up of all types of people – women and men like you, who, through training and experience, have learned to accomplish extraordinary things. Navy life is rigorous, but it is also rewarding. Just ask the sailors aboard this ship, whose lives have been changed because of their experiences in Canada and abroad.

The Navy supports the Canadian Forces in fulfilling its three roles:

  • Defending Canada
  • Defending North America
  • Contributing to International Peace and Security

HMCS Moncton had a very busy year in 2011/12. She participated in Operation Caribbe, Canada’s contribution to the U.S.-led counter-narcotics operations in the Caribbean, followed by a Fisheries Patrol. She deployed soon after for Operation Nanook, Canada’s annual sovereignty mission in the High Arctic. Most recently, Moncton completed mine countermeasure duties as part of Exercises Bold Alligator and Frontier Sentinel, both of which were combined U.S.-Canadian naval exercises.

HMCS Summerside

Picture of HMCS Summerside on ocean

Welcome aboard Her Majesty's Canadian Ship (HMCS) Summerside. During your visit, you will have a glimpse into what life in the Navy is like aboard one of the Canadian Forces’ Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels. By touring the ship, handling sophisticated equipment and speaking with the sailors, you will have a first-hand experience of a world-class Navy.

HMCS Summerside is the 12th and final Kingston Class maritime coastal defense vessel, designed for coastal surveillance measures to protect national sovereignty. 

HMCS Summerside’s versatile deck capabilities allow it to adapt to a variety of equipment, enabling it to do naval mine countermeasures, bottom object inspection, sonar scanning of the seabed and remote underwater vehicle operations.

The first ship to bear the name Summerside was a Flower Class corvette that served the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II, assisting with Operation Neptune, the code name for the Normandy Landings as part of D-Day (Operation Overlord).

The ship's company, primarily made up of Naval Reserve personnel, carries out operational tasks such as mine countermeasures, search and rescue and maritime domain awareness. HMCS Summerside’s other functions include anti-smuggling operations, resource protection, fisheries and environmental monitoring, counter-terrorism, disaster relief and scientific research.

The Navy is made up of all types of people – women and men like you, who, through training and experience, have learned to accomplish extraordinary things. Navy life is rigorous, but it is also rewarding. Just ask the sailors aboard this ship, whose lives have been changed because of their experiences in Canada and abroad.

The Navy supports the Canadian Forces in fulfilling its three roles:

  • Defending Canada
  • Defending North America
  • Contributing to International Peace and Security

 

Both HMCS Summerside and Moncton participated in Exercise Bold Alligator 2012, conducting mine countermeasures off the coast of North Carolina in January and February 2012. The ships underwent repeated drills in areas like engineering emergencies, force protection and combat tactics, designed to expose the ships’ companies to realistic and sometimes stressful scenarios in preparation for this multinational exercise with the United States Navy.

HMCS Summerside, along with HMCS Moncton, took part in Exercise Frontier Sentinel held in Sydney, Nova Scotia in May 2012. HMCS Summerside used an Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) to detect and identify training mines at the bottom of Sydney Harbour. The Navy's ability to use UUVs shows the impressive capabilities these ships possess.

War of 1812

Picture of USS Hurrican and USS De Wert on ocean

June 2012 marks 200 years since the declaration of the War of 1812 which was a crucial event in the making of our great country. The War helped establish our path toward becoming an independent and free country, united under the Crown with a respect for linguistic and ethnic diversity.

The War contributed to define our unique relationship with our greatest ally, the U.S. – a relationship of peace and prosperity between our two countries. The events of 200 years ago remind us that the link between sea power and our nation’s security and prosperity is increasingly relevant today – as safe and secure sea lanes allow our economies to grow.

The Royal Canadian Navy’s most fundamental job is to protect the security and prosperity of Canada and Canadians. We do our job, in many cases, by contributing to continental and international operations alongside our allies, of which the U.S. is the most important. To celebrate this event the American vessels USS De Wert and the USS Hurricane will join Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships Ville de Québec, Summerside and Moncton in the Great Lakes Deployment.

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